Holiday Greetings

Holiday Greetings: Chodesh Tov! Rosh Chodesh Fifth Month 2018 #BuckMoon

An artist’s representation of the Buck Moon. Image credit: TwelveTotems.org

Shalom everyone! Rosh Chodesh Fifth Month, the first day of the Fifth Month, begins sundown Friday, July 27, 2018 on the ecclesiastical lunar calendar, with the sighting of the full moon. In the Northern Hemisphere, this month’s full moon is also called the “Buck Moon.” TwelveTotems.org wishes a “Chodesh Tov” (“A Good Month”) to all who observe!


About This Month

The Fifth Month of the Hebrew calendar, and eleventh month of the “civil year,” became known as “Av” after the Babylonian Exile. The word “Av” comes from the Akkadian word Abu which means “father.” In Hebrew, the word “Av” also means “father.”

The following are the holidays and special events that occur during the Fifth Month:

  • 9 of Fifth Month – Tisha B’Av (Fast of the Fifth Month)

The following are some of the significant events in Israelite history which occurred during the Fifth Month:

  • 1 of Fifth Month (circa 1273 BCE) – Death of high priest Aaron
  • 1 of Fifth Month (513 BCE) – Ezra and his followers arrive in Israel
  • 4 of Fifth Month (2132 AM) – Birth of Issachar, son of Jacob
  • 7 of Fifth Month (586 BCE) – First Temple invaded by King Nebuchadnezzar
  • 7 of Fifth Month (67 CE) – Civil war breaks out in besieged Jerusalem; one group set fire to the city’s food stores, which is said to have quickened starvation.
  • 9 of Fifth Month (586 BCE) – Holy Temple destroyed by the Babylonians
  • 9 of Fifth Month (70 CE) – Holy Temple destroyed by the Romans respectively.
  • 9 of Fifth Month (133 CE) – Fall of Betar to the Romans, ending Bar Kochba‘s rebellion.
  • 10 of Fifth Month (70 CE) – The Holy Temple, set on fire the previous day, finishes burning.
  • 15 of Fifth Month – The Day of the Breaking of the Ax – when the Holy Temple existed, the cutting of firewood for the altar was completed on this date every year. The event was celebrated by feasting, rejoicing, and the ceremonial breaking of the axes.

 

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